Understanding the Basics of Spousal Support

Understanding the Basics of Spousal Support

What is Spousal Support?

Like many people filing for divorce in Arizona, you may end up paying alimony or spousal support maintenance. This is especially true if you earn substantially more money than your spouse or have been married for several years.

However, if you were only married for a short period of time or you and your spouse earn similar amounts, you may not be required to make alimony payments.

Determining Alimony

If a judge orders you to pay alimony, you will need to pay your ex-spouse a specific amount each month until the date the judge sets for the future, your former spouse remarries, or your children no longer need a full-time parent at home.

A judge may also determine after a reasonable period of time that alimony is no longer necessary. The judge in your case may also determine that your spouse has not made a sufficient effort to become at least partially self-supporting.

Another significant event, such as retirement, may convince the judge to modify the amount you owe your spouse.

Paying Alimony

As with most issues arising in your divorce, you and your ex-spouse can actually agree to the amount and length of your alimony payment. If you and your ex-spouse can’t agree, then the court will set the terms for you.

However, this likely means a trial, which can end up costing you considerable time and money. For more than 100 years, alimony has been the law in states, even though it is ordered somewhat less frequently these days.

Refusing to Pay

If you secure an alimony order and your spouse refuses to pay, you should take immediate action to enforce the order through a proceeding or an earnings assignment order.

As in any court order, these orders to pay alimony will have force and can end up with the very real possibility of obtaining regular payments.

The attorneys of Thrush Law Group have the legal experience needed to provide legal counsel in a variety of legal matters. Get in touch with us for your free family law consultation.


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